Beauty Product Bans the U.S. Ignores

by Jade Feasel | Mar 08 2017

Our neighbors across the pond, Europe, and other countries typically have a strong opinion on harmful products and animal testings. They act quickly and are not sorry to ban products or companies that have harmful additives in their ingredient list. U.S. seems to have a much more relaxed idea about how these ingredients can harm you. 

Formaldehyde 

You've probably heard of this one because it is the main product used for embalming. Yes, embalming. Formaldehyde is a carcinogen often found in face powders, but most famously in Brazilian Blowouts hair straightening products, as well as other similar brands. 

 

Phenylenediamine 

Found in box hair dyes that darken the hair. These ingredients can bring serious allergic reactions and is still being studied in the U.S. 

 

Oxybenzone 

This hormone disrupting ingredient is often found in sunscreen. Make sure to read your label or you could end up with fertility problems and increasing appetite. 

 

Petroleum 

Though pretoleum derived products are fantastic at keeping the skin moisturized and baby soft, there are links to cancer. The long term effects are questionable, as using a product with this in it once will not likely result in cancer, but consistent use greatly increases your chances. This includes the parrafin wax at salons and in hair care products like Pantene

 

Phthalates 

Often found in skin care, nail polis, and haircare, this ingredient is linked to cancer and hormonal disruption. The test have only been done on animals (which is the exact reason Europe and similar countries have banned the ingredient) so stay away until there is a clear definition of long term use on humans. 

 

Do your shampoos or haircare products have these ingredients on their labels? Make sure to dispose if they do, and grab yourself a wash set from HSI Professional for salon quality hair that won't worry your health concerns. We also NEVER test on animals. 


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